Dealing with Iran

Matthew Hoy
By Matthew Hoy on May 19, 2008

Here's John McCain's remarks on Barack Obama's prospective Iran policy.

Before I begin my prepared remarks, I want to respond briefly to a comment Senator Obama made yesterday about the threat posed to the United States by the Government of Iran. Senator Obama claimed that the threat Iran poses to our security is “tiny” compared to the threat once posed by the former Soviet Union. Obviously, Iran isn’t a superpower and doesn’t possess the military power the Soviet Union had. But that does not mean that the threat posed by Iran is insignificant. On the contrary, right now Iran provides some of the deadliest explosive devices used in Iraq to kill our soldiers. They are the chief sponsor of Shia extremists in Iraq, and terrorist organizations in the Middle East. And their President, who has called Israel a “stinking corpse,” has repeatedly made clear his government’s commitment to Israel’s destruction. Most worrying, Iran is intent on acquiring nuclear weapons. The biggest national security challenge the United States currently faces is keeping nuclear material out of the hands of terrorists. Should Iran acquire nuclear weapons, that danger would become very dire, indeed. They might not be a superpower, but the threat the Government of Iran poses is anything but ‘tiny”.

Senator Obama has declared, and repeatedly reaffirmed his intention to meet the President of Iran without any preconditions, likening it to meetings between former American Presidents and the leaders of the Soviet Union. Such a statement betrays the depth of Senator Obama’s inexperience and reckless judgment. Those are very serious deficiencies for an American president to possess. An ill conceived meeting between the President of the United States and the President of Iran, and the massive world media coverage it would attract, would increase the prestige of an implacable foe of the United States, and reinforce his confidence that Iran’s dedication to acquiring nuclear weapons, supporting terrorists and destroying the State of Israel had succeeded in winning concessions from the most powerful nation on earth. And he is unlikely to abandon the dangerous ambitions that will have given him a prominent role on the world stage.

This is not to suggest that the United States should not communicate with Iran our concerns about their behavior. Those communications have already occurred at an appropriate level, which the Iranians recently suspended. But a summit meeting with the President of the United States, which is what Senator Obama proposes, is the most prestigious card we have to play in international diplomacy. It is not a card to be played lightly. Summit meetings must be much more than personal get-acquainted sessions. They must be designed to advance American interests. An unconditional summit meeting with the next American president would confer both international legitimacy on the Iranian president and could strengthen him domestically when he is unpopular among the Iranian people. It is likely such a meeting would not only fail to persuade him to abandon Iran’s nuclear ambitions; its support of terrorists and commitment to Israel’s extinction, it could very well convince him that those policies are succeeding in strengthening his hold on power, and embolden him to continue his very dangerous behavior. The next President ought to understand such basic realities of international relations.

I think McCain's exactly right on this. Glad-handing wannabe genocidal-terrorist likely wouldn't improve our standing with the reported 80 percent of the Iranian populace who prefer the U.S. to the regime Ahmadinnerjacket represents. And the idea that a regime on the verge of attaining nuclear weapons only presents a "tiny" threat to the U.S. is deluded in a post-9/11 world. I'm sure even Obama would acknowledge this if asked the simple question: Which is a greater threat: Iran or 19 radical Islamists with flight training?

Last week, Obama defended his foreign policy by pointing to JFK's meeting with Russian Premier Nikita Kruschev while we were on the "brink" of war. The meeting occurred in June 1961. The Cuban Missile Crisis wouldn't happen until 15 months later. Just what does Obama think the word "brink" means?

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Taped The Argument earlier today, fumbled through some closing remarks; this from @michaelbd is the more eloquent version of what I tried to say:
https://www.nationalreview.com/2022/06/roes-end-it-took-everybody/

For some amount of time today, the CA DOJ's new data website leaked name and addresses of people with CCW permits.

Someone PM'd me with video evidence of it (can't share to protect confidential info).

Here is a reddit thread with discussion. https://www.reddit.com/r/CAguns/comments/vm723i/attorney_general_bonta_releases_new_firearms_data?sort=confidence

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