Clinton’s Email Security

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After months of requests, former Secretary of State, and current Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton finally turned over her infamous personal email server to the FBI.

But the real news today is that Clinton’s email security was a joke. We’re safe in assuming that the Russians, Chinese and any other half-way interested party (but not Congress or the State Department) has all of Clinton’s emails.

The FBI is looking into the security of the Clinton email arrangement. There is no evidence she used encryption to shield the emails or her personal server from foreign intelligence services or other prying eyes.

Yep, no encryption. For the record, you can find my public key here if anyone wants to send mean encrypted email. It’s so tough to set this stuff up that even a former journalist could do it.

Depending on how complete the “wipe” of her server was, we may find out about the planning of Chelsea’s wedding and her yoga appointments—and everything else she didn’t want us to know about.

The other interesting fact to come out today was this one:

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa said two emails that traversed Clinton’s personal system were deemed “Top Secret, Sensitive Compartmented Information” — a rating that is among the government’s highest classifications.

Grassley said the inspector general of the nation’s intelligence community had reported the new details about the higher classification to Congress on Tuesday.

Those two emails were among four that had previously been determined by the inspector general of the intelligence community to have been classified at the time they were sent. The State Department disputes that the emails were classified at that time.

This last bit is interesting. Whatever that information is, how likely is it (in the State Department’s estimation) that no one thought it was classified at the time, but in retrospect they’re going to put a “Top Secret, Sensitive Compartmented Information” stamp on it.

When Hillary sent or received it, it could’ve been printed on the front page of the New York Times, but in retrospect…?

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